Rain on Rainier had me Crying Like a Baby

Day Two on the Wonderland Trail of fourteen had me calling it quits in the rain. We slogged up the trail in mud and crossed lovely Deer Creek spirits high for the start of our next day’s adventure. Strapping on our backpacks trusty rain covers, we were set for our first full day.

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Washington has a way with words and numerous ways of describing rain. There is drizzle, downpours, washouts, spitting rain, rain that hits puddles and rains up, icy rain, summer rain, fog, mist, overcast, and showers. Most of us do not use or can even find an umbrella on a regular basis and we can spot a tourist or newcomer when they pull their’s out. I would say we are a hardy lot when it comes to the rain and actually many of us, really love the smell a light drizzle conjures from the ground. Many times on the westside of the state we do not see the sun for weeks and one summer I counted 41 continual days of rain.

In the mountains it can be dangerous. The rain can also suck the life out of you even in August. It did just that on day two. The beautiful scenery in the fog and drizzle had me a bit euphoric at first. Or, it could have been that celebratory bottle of wine I had to run the empty back up to the car before setting out. In my skort with exposed legs, I actually felt pretty comfortable in just a long sleeve shirt layer and an old pair of ankle gaitors. Especially when carrying a heavy pack that weighed between 32-45 pounds, it actually felt quite refreshing.

By the time lunchtime rolled around my body was completely drenched and I simply hightailed it to camp to change while the others in my party stayed at gorgeous Owyhigh (OH-Y-HIGH) Lakes for their lunch.

When Carrie showed up from the other direction, my friends Shannon and Sheli were attempting to push as much hot liquid and tea down me as they could and I was wrapped in an emergency I blanket and poncho. I wanted to go home. Carrie was like a happy angel that had been sent with a magic bag. She kept pulling out clothes andI kept putting them on. She rubbed my hands together, gave me her gloves, hand warmers, toe warmers and by the time I had changed, had all my wet items hanging on the trees to dry.

Later on that evening, with ziplocks in my soaked boots, I clambered up to Tamanos Mountain for a Fireball happy hour. I would like to say at the top we had a gorgeous view of Rainier but what the heck, more rain.

gallon ziplocks are part of the 10 essentials

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Trees work as great drying racks

Tomorrow is a new day and we settled in for the night, two bugs snug in a rug.

Episode 2– 14 Days of Wonderland video is on the very popular Summerland Trail on the Wonderland system. 

Still boasting the ziplock plastic bags in her shoes, Lisa contemplates returning them to Carrie. Upon summiting to camp it is found the camp had recently been ransacked by a bear. Runtime 6:46

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